My wife Maddy and I , with the help of a few neighbors, planted the fields in the front of the farm property in the Spring of 2011. We started with 1ft. long propagation sticks of over 30 different varieties.

The first willow cuttings were completed by us in the spring of 2012, and it was a rather paltry harvest! But fortunately, with some willow sticks that I had been giving by my good friend Frank, I was able to continue to weave through the rest of the year.

The harvesting for the following three years, however provided enough dried willow (willow rods, sticks, or whips to use in weaving hand made baskets), willow propagation starts (shorter sticks, called willow starts, which can be planted to restore stream beds and wetlands, for controlling erosion, and for providing riparian habitat), and living willow rods. or cuttings (7 ft. willow whips used in garden structures of beanpoles, pea sticks, trellis, archway fencing, wattle work and border edging, and for making living willow structures), that I decided to offer my sticks for sale. You can find samples of these willow cuttings on my "Willow" page.

I currently offer or 20 different willow varieties which I use in all these coppicing crafts. The Propagation starts are available for you to plant your own stock in the early spring . The 7 ft. long living willow rods to be used for garden structures are shipped in a timely fashion for you to replant, also in early spring.  The dry willow rods are stored for two years before they are sold for your basket weaving needs, and are now available in many varieties, year round.

The locals know me as the Basket Farmer. It is indeed a blessing to be a working and living willow farmer. Please let us know if you are in the Southeastern Ohio area, to look at the stock and walk through our gardens and fields.

Willow Harvest, Fall 215

Willow Harvest, Fall 215

Inventory, 2016 season

Inventory, 2016 season




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